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Andrea Andrich: “I'm an interior design enthusiast”

Andrea Andrich: “I'm an interior design enthusiast”

It's monday and we present a new player of the week in our new ccb magazine series "Player of the week" (Part 28): Today: Andrea Andrich. Andrea was born in Italy, he is an architect and specialized in urban planning and participatory design.  


CCB Magazine: Hi Andrea, who are you and what do you do?

Andrea Andrich: I'm Andrea Andrich (my parents lack in creativity), I was born in a very small town in the Dolomites, in Italy’s northeast, almost 18... ehm, 35 years ago. I could have been a shepherd or a ski teacher but no, I'm an architect. I'm specialized in urban planning and participatory design but I'm also an interior design enthusiast. I've recently started working as a freelance architect, developing interior design projects such as flat renovations, leisure spaces design and other projects.

CCB Magazine: How did you get into architecture and interior design?

Andrea Andrich: Studying, studying, studying, working, working, working. Apart from that, I've always tried to trust my instincts and follow my curiosity, looking for new challenges, opportunities and, above all, new things to learn. Life is nothing but evolution and if you stop you'll be lost. In the past couple of years I've been involved in many different projects in different sectors and I'm satisfied with my multifaceted background. I live my present knowing that it's not an arrival point at all. I welcome new adventures, new inspirations and new partners in crime – because Why not?!

Life is nothing but evolution and if you stop you'll be lost

CCB Magazine: What is special about your work? What makes the difference compared to other professional fields and creative branches? What kind of qualification do you need for this?

Andrea Andrich: Architecture is a very strange discipline that involves many other disciplines, both technical and artistic. A project has to comply with structural, legal, aesthetic, financial, social, communicative, ecological issues. The mission of an architect is to manage these different aspects with a flexible point of view, in order to achieve a balanced final result. Easy task? Not at all, of course! And it's evident, our world is full of bad architecture.

CCB Magazine: What do you hope to achieve through your work?

Andrea Andrich: I want to reach people. It seems an obvious answer but it’s not. I don't believe in architecture for its own sake, as a stylistic and narcissistic exercise. I don't believe in these stunning renders of impossible buildings that you can see in architectural magazines. They are like a porn movie. Real sex in real life is a completely different thing. We should design for people, the final users of our architecture. We should listen and guide them into the understanding and realization of their needs and wishes. In my job I always try to remember that I'm an architect but I'm also a user. I live in a flat, I go to clubs, I drink in bars, I shop in stores, I relax in parks. I live spaces, I observe them, I analyze them, what works good, what's wrong, what sensations I feel. I always try to pour my everyday experience as a user into my projects. And, at the same time, I listen to the experiences of others. I design for real people and I want to keep on doing that.

"For the interior, I chose bright colours and wood in order to have bright spaces and a comfortable atmosphere.", Small suburban house, Rome, © Andrea Andrich.

CCB Magazine: You live in Berlin: What does that mean to you and your work?

Andrea Andrich: I'm in Berlin both for personal and professional reasons. I fell in love with this city few years ago and I finally decided to move here a couple of months ago. I feel good here, like when you wear a dress that fits you perfectly and you feel comfortable and invincible. Berlin is the most relevant creative hub at the moment. It's overcrowded maybe, everybody striving for existing, looking for a place, but still a perfect place for meeting other creative minds. That's what I'm looking for and what I expect form this city: meeting/knowing brilliant and adventurous professionals, increasing my network for developing new ideas, creating multidisciplinary projects. It's going to be tough but I'm optimistic that this is the right place.

I wish that there will be a strong and forward-thinking political class to govern this evolution in Berlin

CCB Magazine: If you were granted one free wish: How should Berlin develop in the future?

Andrea Andrich: There are many people complaining about a sort of ongoing Berlin decadence. I don't know if (and how) things were better fifteen years ago but yes, gentrification processes (and their bad consequences) are present and evident. And people have the right to complain about that. It's a political task to (well) govern a city and ensure a balance between market aims and people needs. Berlin will evolve, for sure, I don't know how but I wish that there will be a strong and forward-thinking political class to govern this evolution, remembering that the city belongs first of all to the citizens. Now I’m going to stop because I will start looking like a dangerous extremist communist... But please, at least safeguard all these parks and trees and green spots which are an incomparable treasure!

CCB Magazine: What are your plans for your future?

Andrea Andrich: This is a tough one. At the moment my dream is to work together with emerging brands/project (especially in the fashion sector) and making architecture a complementary part of their image from the beginning. In general, architecture as a communication strategy is a theme that really interests me. I'd love to develop projects that involve other creative disciplines. I'd also like to repeat the experience of designing a club.And yes, I'm planning to be fluent in German. I'll make it!

CCB Magazine: Thank you Andrea and stay in touch.


Profile of Andrea Andrich on Creative City Berlin 

Portfolios of Andres Andrich on Creative City Berlin

Rubrik: Im Profil

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